Revolution

The Spanish Revolution, 2011


Thousands of residents in Spain have gathered to protest against government corruption, unemployment, and the current economic situation. What started as a small protest in Madrid on May 15th extended to 30,000 thousand protesters. “Los Indignados” or “The Indignant”  have turned the landmark Puerta del Sol square into an urban village in which they sleep, eat, sing, and create artistic posters exposing their social beliefs. They stand against violence and drug/alcohol use during the demonstration, and have volunteers keeping the event organized. There are stations for water and food distribution, recycling, restrooms, media sharing, and even medical support. Due to the mass amount of people, many of the volunteers solely focus on cleaning the plaza frequently. “This is our time to fight for what we believe, and we’re not leaving until we get it” said one of the protesters Saturday morning. Similar demonstrations have spread in over 50 cities, including Alicante, Cadiz, and London.

Photo by Natalie Edgar. Saturday, May 21, 2011

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The Plan

A protest leader gives his speech in the Puerta del Sol plaza on May 19 during the rally against the current social and political system in Spain. The rally beginning on May 15th has spread to cities throughtout Spain and even other countries in Europe like France, Germany, Denmark, and Belgium.  Photo by Natalie Edgar. Madrid, Spain. May 19, 2011

Madrid, Spain. May 19, 2011. A protest leader gives his speech in the Puerta del Sol plaza on May 19 during the rally against the current social and political system in Spain. The rally beginning on May 15th has spread to cities throughtout Spain and even other countries in Europe like France, Germany, Denmark, and Belgium.



	

Los Indignados — The Spanish Revolution

Madrid, Spain. May 19, 2011. Protestor holds the front page article of Que Es: the publication reporting news from Barcelona, Madrid, Valencia, etc.  Due to amount of people that joined the ¨Spanish Revolution¨ also known as the ¨Acampada Sol¨ tension increased during the time of elections. The initial plan was for the demonstration to last until Sunday, election day. Due to their disappointment from the Conservative Party´s win, demonstrators plan to remain until at least May 29th.


Protestors Maintain Order

The ¨15M Movement¨  that started May 15, has maintained overall organization with the help of volunteers and donations made by civilians of food, water, cleaning supplies, utensils, etc.  The people show their cohesive efforts to provoke change in a non-violent, and positive way. ¨The revolucion no es botellon,¨ a phrase widely used to declare that alcohol use during the demonstration would not be appreciated or supported. Photo by Natalie Edgar. Madrid, Spain. May 19, 2011


Puerta del Sol Plaza– Protestors New Home

¨They call it democracy, but it isn´t!¨ Reads the sign next to a couple sleeping in a tent during ¨Acampada Sol.¨ Protestors turned the Puerta del Sol plaza into their own ¨acampada¨ or camp site on May 15th. Demonstrators have created signs filled with messages about peace, revolution, equality, and their rights. The movement demonstrates the widespread disillusionment felt by the people of Spain due to the political situation in which many consider to be corrupt and unfair. Photo by Natalie Edgar. Madrid, Spain. May 19, 2011.


No Tenemos Casa, Nos Quedamos En La Plaza

¨We don´t have a home, we´ll stay on the plaza.¨ A volunteer during the ¨Spanish Revolution¨ collects cardboard boxes to use as posters during the demonstration held in the Plaza del Sol square. Madrid, Spain. May 20, 2011.


The Most Important Weapon:

Through artistic expression, protestors showed their social and political views on the current situation in Spain regarding govermental policy. Photo by Natalie Edgar. Madrid, Spain. May 19, 2011.


Rise and Shine

One of the protestors covers herself in a shawl due to the cool morning weather during the waking hours of ¨Acampada Sol.¨

Photo by Natalie Edgar. Madrid, Spain. May 19, 2011


The Climb

Protestors climb on top of the glass dome of the metro station to hang the gigantic sign expressing their social beliefs concerning the world's political and social system. Due to enormity of the sign, it took them over 8 hours to create and hang the poster. ¨Lo logramos!¨or ¨We succeeded!¨ Shouted one of the teenagers as they finished. Photo by Natalie Edgar. Madrid, Spain. May 21, 2011